Hawaiʻi Homefront: Life in the Islands During World War II

HawaiiHomeFront.jpg
HawaiiHomeFront2.jpg
HawaiiHomeFront3.jpg
HawaiiHomeFront.jpg
HawaiiHomeFront2.jpg
HawaiiHomeFront3.jpg
sold out

Hawaiʻi Homefront: Life in the Islands During World War II

29.95

Currently Being Revised; a new edition will be available soon!

MacKinnon Simpson

hard cover, 11" x 8.375"
224 pp

Add To Cart

ABOUT:

This book tells the story of life in Hawaii during World War II. Hawaii was both a home front and a war zone, the only American territory to have that distinction. Almost 40% of the Islands' permanent population was of Japanese heritage--some 140,000 people--and were classified as enemy aliens by the federal government, despite the majority of them being American citizens. A few men who believed in their loyalty defied the feds, and kept them from internment camps on the mainland. Well over a million men and women--both service members and war workers--passed through these Islands during the war. The book is profusely illustrated, and many of the images have rarely (if ever) been previously published.

AUTHOR:

MacKinnon Simpson has served as historian and exhibit designer for the Hawaii Maritime Center on Pier 7 and has researched, authored and designed more than twenty books and scores of articles. He is an alumnus of Princeton University and is the father of two superb writers in their own right- Malia and Alika. 

 

OTHER TITLES YOU MIGHT LIKE